Myths about miscarriages

Feelings of grief and loss are common among women who have experienced a miscarriage. To worsen the situation, there are plenty of myths and misconceptions surrounding miscarriages. Staying informed can help you deal with the trauma in a more effective manner.

 

 

Common miscarriage myths

  1. Exercise and lifting heavy objects cause miscarriages: The belief that exercise and lifting heavy objects can cause miscarriage has no basis in fact. To the contrary, moderate exercise during pregnancy is actually beneficial and healthy. Of course, being careful is always advised.
  2. Birth control pills cause miscarriages: There is a myth that exists which states that if you were taking birth control pills prior to trying for a baby, your chances of not carrying to term increase. This is false, as having taken a daily birth control pill has shown to have no effect on a developing embryo.
  3. Stress is the reason for a miscarriage: It is impossible to shield yourself from inevitable stresses that come with day-to-day activities and life in general. The link between stress and pregnancy loss is an old wives’ tale. A 2003 study revealed that there was no increased risk of miscarriage in women who experienced stress in the early stages of pregnancy.

Truth be told

The truth is that miscarriages are sometimes caused by medical factors such as abnormal uterine structure or congenital anomalies. However, miscarriages have no clear cause. Knowledge is power and knowing this may give you peace of mind that your miscarriage had little to do with something you did or didn’t do. However, it doesn’t necessarily ease the inevitable heartbreak that you may be feeling.

“There is no correct way to deal with the grief of pregnancy loss.”

There is no correct way to deal with the grief of pregnancy loss. Grief can linger and can be dealt with in a variety of different ways. The most important thing you need to remember is to partake in some self-care during this time.

Self-care after miscarriage

  • Maintain proper hygiene after a miscarriage by using tampons or sanitary napkins to help with any bleeding.
  • Showering twice a day will also help to regulate your temperature.
  • Many women experience headaches after a miscarriage and using hot and cold compresses can help ease this pain, along with any cramps you may be experiencing.
  • Your body also needs to stay hydrated to recover from the loss, so be sure to drink at least eight glasses of water every day.
  • Book an appointment with your doctor to discuss the best way forward medically and emotionally.

Remember to give yourself time and space to grieve and heal.

Also read:

Live your best pregnancy
Tokophobia: What it’s like to have a phobia of pregnancy and childbirth