5 fun Earth Day facts for kids and parents

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Annually, 22 April is observed as Earth Day globally. 2022 is no exception, with Google joining in the movement as always. Every year, Google creates a doodle to commemorate Earth Day. Last year, Google released a chain of tree plantations as many little people planted trees in an animation. This year’s doodle highlights the impact of climate change across four different locales around the planet.

Earth Day 2022

The 2022 Earth Day theme is Invest In Our Planet, and to teach ourselves and our children about Earth Day, here are some quick facts about International Mother Earth Day. 

The day has been observed for 52 years! 

According to EarthDay.org, the first official Earth Day was in 1970. A junior Winsconsin senator, Senator Gaylord Nelson, saw the dire effects of a massive oil spill in California. He rallied up some activists and started an environmental teaching campaign for college students. The movement quickly grew globally, and protests were organised globally. Senator Nelson received the Presidential Medal of Freedom — the highest honour given to civilians in the United States. 

20 million Americans took part in the first Earth Day 

To demonstrate the effects of 15 years of industrial development, 20 million Americans took to the streets to protest. The movement rallied people that were fighting pollution individually. 

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The first Earth Day was a huge success.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency was created at the end of 1970. Earth Day also led to the creation of numerous environmental laws, including the Clean Water Act and the Clean Air Act. Other laws that have followed that have led to the protection of human lives from deadly diseases. 

It went global in 1990 

Twenty years after the first one, the movement became global. This time, the movement mobiles 200 million people from across the globe and also paved the way for the 1992 United Nations Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro.

The day engages 1 billion people globally

Earth Day 2000 and 2010 have been big highlights for the movement. More and more people are rallying behind the movement, sending a clear message to world leaders: We all need to work together and take action against the damage to our climate and the restoration.