Bin it, baby!

When I did my first baby’s nursery a few years ago, nappy disposal system options were so limited that I had to create an Amazon account and have one shipped to me in South Africa.

Years later, the same nappy bins I could choose from are available in South Africa but the bin liner refills are pretty pricey.

korbell white bin

There are three main factors to consider when choosing a bin: hygiene, whether it is odour free or not and the economical side of it.

After exploring the various options available, I decided it was worth reviewing the Korbell Nappy disposal system to see if I could find a bin that actually ticked all those boxes.

Although the actual bin is the most expensive one on the market (at about R399 for the 16L bin), it has the best features and offers the best value for money when it comes to the longevity of the bin, and the cost and quality of the plastic liners.

There are many other factors that I love about this system:

It is available in 16L and 26L options depending on your specific requirements. Think twins vs. a singleton; two babies under the age of two, or a public nappy changing area in a restaurant vs. your baby’s nursery, for example.

korbell bin linersThe plastic refills are 100% biodegradable in landfills and are made with 20% recycled materials, making them better for the environment.

The refills are also scented, which goes a long way to disguise unpleasant odours when opening and closing the bin.

mom changing baby's nappy with korbell binAnd then there is the hygienic, hands-free convenience. Simply step on the pedal to open the lid and release your foot to close it again. This way you can keep both hands on your wriggling baby and not have to worry about having an unhygienic bin in the room.

korbell colour binsThere are four colours to choose from, one of which is sure to blend in with your nursery décor and your house at a later stage: pink, blue, white and mint (which happens to have been Pinterest colour of the year in 2016 and is similar to Pantoney’s greenery colour of the year in 2017).

man using a korbell bin as a dustbinThe bin has longevity and grows with your family’s needs. When you’re past the nappy stage, simply slip off the plastic liner insert part and it converts to a stylish pedal bin.

mom and daughter with korbell binAnother well-thought-out feature is the “trapdoor”, which opens with the weight of a nappy and closes again when then nappy is in the bin. There is a button to childproof the lid and trapdoor, preventing odours from escaping or inquisitive little hands from pulling out the dirty nappies.

With some of the other nappy bins on the market, you actually have to manually twist the top of the bin to ensure that the nappy is sealed inside. Not only does this result in a waste of plastic, but you also have to take your eyes off your baby for a moment – and every mom knows that this could be a moment too long!

The Korbell bin can be opened completely, meaning it is very easy to clean and disinfect every part. Another awesome thing I discovered is that the actual plastic refill can take about 495 dirty nappies from end to end before you need to replace it, as opposed to some other brands refills that can only take 200 or less.

The 16L capacity bin that we reviewed could take about 10-11 heavily soiled nappies before I had to rid the bin of its contents and reset for the next load. We compared the features and affordability of three market competitors: take a look and see for yourself what makes this bin the market leader.

nappy bin linersAs you can see in the picture, we actually rolled out the liners to determine the length of them and while brand A is longer than the Korbell liners, it is substantially thinner than the Korbell liners. With brand A, you also need to twist after each nappy to put it in the bin, which wastes a lot of the liner.